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Randall M Lee
Aug 02, 2022
In Welcome to the Forum
There is a common misconception that the more pages you have for a keyword, the better you will rank for that keyword. After all, the more pages there are, the more portals there are, the more likely Google will increase the weight of your keywords and improve your SERP rankings, right? However, it didn't. that is not real. In fact, targeting a specific keyword across multiple pages almost always has the exact opposite effect. You may end up doing more damage to your SEO instead. The reason is simple: when you rank Latest Mailing Database multiple pages for the same keyword, you are actually competing with yourself. Therefore, the click-through rate, weight and conversion rate of each page are lower than that of a comprehensive page. We call this SEO myth keyword stuffing. What is Keyword Stuffing Keyword stuffing is the result of you "suicide" yourself - you break down the click-through rate, links, content and (often) conversions between different pages into two. When you do this, you're not showing Google the breadth or depth of your knowledge, you're not improving the site's authority for that query. Instead, you ask Google to weigh your pages and choose the one that best matches your keyword. For example, if your website sells shoes, and "shoes" is the only keyword you're targeting, you can tell Google that every page is about "shoes," whether it's hiking shoes, tennis shoes, sneakers, etc. key 6 Ways Word Stuffing Can Negatively Affect Your SEO Sadly, keyword stuffing has some potentially disastrous consequences for your SEO. Many people who use keyword stuffing don't even know what's wrong. They might even be happy that a page ranks in the fifth and sixth slot for the target keyword, not realizing that an authority page might rank higher and convert better. However, the practical consequences are clear: lost site traffic, queries that lead to wrong pages, SERP ranking fluctuations, and ultimately lost sales. Why? because: 1. You are reducing the weight of the page You don’t have to have one highly authoritative page, but instead divide the CTR into multiple moderately relevant pages. Essentially, you've turned your web page into a competitor, and now you're fighting for page views and SERP rankings. 2. You are diluting your links and anchor text The backlinks you may have gone to a comprehensive source of information are now splitting between two (or more) pages. Likewise, your anchor text and internal links will lead visitors to multiple different pages rather than one authoritative page on the topic. 3. Google may drop more relevant pages Keywords is one of the main ways we help Google understand our pages. If all your keywords are the same, Google will try to understand which page is the best fit - if your content is too similar, it may cause Google to "misunderstand" you. 4. You are wasting your crawl budget Your crawl budget is the number of times search engine spiders crawl your site in a given time period. Dedicating multiple pages to the same keyword leads to crawling and indexing of unwanted pages. (Note: Small sites may not notice the difference, or don't have to worry about their crawl budget, but large e-commerce sites or vendors with multiple products will notice the difference.) 5. A telltale sign of poor page quality for Multiple pages for the same keyword tell your users that your content may be thin, and it also shows that Google's content may not match the keyword on each page. 6. Your conversion rate will suffer Inevitably, one of your pages will convert better than others. Instead of directing new visitors to that page and making it the most authoritative page, leads are lost on less relevant pages. How to Identify Keyword Stuffing Fortunately, once you've identified the problem, fixing keyword stuffing is easy. Identifying keyword similarity is as easy as creating a keyword matrix. Just create a spreadsheet listing all of your site's important URLs and their associated keywords. For example, if your website sells shoes, your spreadsheet might look like this.
How to find and remove keyword stuffing in order to improve SEO performance? content media
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Randall M Lee

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